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Cases in the U.S.

CDC COVID Data Tracker - Cases and Deaths by State
Categories: C.D.C. (U.S.), Health

Archive of COVID-19 Vaccination Data Updates

CDC reports COVID-19 vaccination data online on COVID Data Tracker and in vaccination datasets.
Categories: C.D.C. (U.S.), Health

CDC COVID-19 Global Response

The goals of CDC's global response to COVID-19 are to limit human-to-human transmission, minimize the impact of COVID-19 in vulnerable countries with limited preparedness capacity, and reduce specific threats that pose current and future risk to the United States.
Categories: C.D.C. (U.S.), Health

Wearing Masks in Travel and Public Transportation Settings

Learn more about the recommendation for masks on public transportation and transportation hubs to prevent the spread of COVID-19.
Categories: C.D.C. (U.S.), Health

COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review

A review of the week's key data from CDC's COVID Data Tracker, narrative interpretations, and visualizations.
Categories: C.D.C. (U.S.), Health

Air Travel Toolkit for Airline Partners

Communication Toolkit for Airlines to inform Travelers and Crew
Categories: C.D.C. (U.S.), Health

COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shot

People who have had 2 shots of Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines may need to start receiving a COVID-19 booster shot 8 months after their second dose.
Categories: C.D.C. (U.S.), Health

Staffing Resources

Federal staffing resources for health departments.
Categories: C.D.C. (U.S.), Health

WHO and MPP announce agreement with NIH for COVID-19 health technologies

WHO news - 12.05.2022

WHO’s COVID-19 Technology Access Pool (C-TAP) and the Medicines Patent Pool (MPP) today finalized a licensing agreement with the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH) for the development of several innovative therapeutics, early-stage vaccines and diagnostic tools for COVID-19.

The licenses, which are transparent, global and non-exclusive, will allow manufacturers from around the world to work with MPP and C-TAP to make these technologies accessible to people living in low- and middle-income countries and help put an end to the pandemic.

The 11 COVID-19 technologies offered under two licences include the stabilized spike protein used in currently available COVID-19 vaccines, research tools for vaccine, therapeutic and diagnostic development as well as early-stage vaccine candidates and diagnostics. The full list of the NIH COVID-19 technologies covered in the agreement is here.

“I welcome the generous contribution NIH has made to C-TAP and its example of solidarity and sharing,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General. “Whether it’s today’s pandemic or tomorrow’s health emergency, it’s through sharing and empowering lower-income countries to manufacture their own health tools that we can ensure a healthier future for everyone.”

“We are honoured to sign these public health-driven licence agreements with NIH under the auspices of C-TAP with the goal of providing equitable access to life-saving health products for the most vulnerable in the world,” said Charles Gore, MPP Executive Director.

“NIH were the first to share their patents with MPP for an HIV product back in 2010 when we were created, and we are delighted to continue strengthening our partnership. It is clear that MPP’s model works across different health technologies.”

The announcement was made today by the US Government at the second Global COVID-19 Summit, co-hosted by the United States, Belize, Germany, Indonesia and Senegal.

Licensing the NIH technologies to MPP under the auspices of C-TAP will allow greater access to these technologies and hopefully lead to the development of commercial products that can address current and future public health needs. In most circumstances, NIH will not collect royalties on sales of products licensed in 49 countries classified by the United Nations as Least Developed Countries.

Launched in 2020 by the WHO Director-General and the President of Costa Rica, and supported by 43 Member States, C-TAP aims to facilitate timely, equitable and affordable access to COVID-19 health products by boosting their production and supply through open, transparent and non-exclusive licensing agreements. MPP provides the licensing expertise to this initiative and holds the licences.

The 11 technologies include: 

  1. Prefusion spike proteins  (Vaccine Development) 
  2. Structure-Based Design of Spike Immunogens  (Research Tool for Vaccine Development) 
  3. Pseudotyping Plasmid (Research Tool for Vaccine Development) 
  4. ACE2 Dimer construct (Research Tool for Drug Development) 
  5. Synthetic humanized llama nanobody library and related use  (Research Tool for Drug and Diagnostic Development)
  6. Newcastle Disease Virus-Like Particles Displaying Prefusion-Stabilized  Spikes (Vaccine Candidate) 
  7. Parainfluenza virus 3 based vaccine (Vaccine Candidate)
  8. A VSV-EBOV-Based Vaccine (Vaccine Candidate)
  9. RNASEH-Assisted Detection Assay for RNA (Diagnostic)
  10. Detection of SARS-CoV-2 and other RNA Virus (Diagnostic)
  11. High-Throughput Diagnostic Test  (Diagnostic)

 

Stay Up to Date with Your Vaccines

people who are up to date with their vaccines are well protected from serious illness or other health outcomes.
Categories: C.D.C. (U.S.), Health

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET)

Learn about hospital surveillance (rates) and how that information helps find who is most at risk for severe illness and death, including important demographic information
Categories: C.D.C. (U.S.), Health

Previous COVID-19 Forecasts: Hospitalizations

Learn about COVID-19 forecasts and modeling for new hospitalizations.
Categories: C.D.C. (U.S.), Health

COVID-19 Forecasts: Deaths

Forecasts show national and state level cumulative reported and predicted deaths since the beginning of the pandemic. CDC is working with partners to bring together weekly COVID-19 forecasts in one place.
Categories: C.D.C. (U.S.), Health

WHO highlights glaring gaps in regulation of alcohol marketing across borders

WHO news - 10.05.2022

A new report from the World Health Organization highlights the increasing use of sophisticated online marketing techniques for alcohol and the need for more effective regulation. It shows that young people and heavy drinkers are increasingly targeted by alcohol advertising, often to the detriment of their health.

Reducing the harm from alcohol – by regulating cross-border alcohol marketing, advertising and promotion is the first report from WHO to detail the full extent of the way that alcohol is today being marketed across national borders – often by digital means – and in many cases regardless of the social, economic or cultural environment in receiving countries.

Worldwide, 3 million people die each year as a result of harmful use of alcohol – one every 10 seconds – representing about 5% of all deaths. A disproportionate number of these alcohol--related deaths occur among younger people, with 13.5% of all deaths among those who are 20–39 years of age being alcohol-related.

“Alcohol robs young people, their families and societies of their lives and potential,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization. “Yet despite the clear risks to health, controls on the marketing of alcohol are much weaker than for other psychoactive products. Better, well enforced and more consistent regulation of alcohol marketing would both save and improve young lives across the world.”

A digital revolution in marketing and promotion

One of the biggest changes in recent years to alcohol marketing is the use of sophisticated online marketing. The collection and analysis of data on users’ habits and preferences by global Internet providers has created new and growing opportunities for alcohol marketers to target messages to specific groups across national borders. Targeted advertising on social media is especially effective at using such data, with its impact strengthened by social influencers and sharing of posts between social media users.

One data source quoted in the report calculated that over 70% of media spending of leading alcohol marketers based in the USA in 2019 was through promotions, product placement and online advertisements in social media.

“The rising importance of digital media means that alcohol marketing has become increasingly cross-border”, said Dag Rekve of the Alcohol, Drugs and Addictive Behaviours Unit at the World Health Organization. “This makes it more difficult for countries that are regulating alcohol marketing to effectively control it in their jurisdictions. More collaboration between countries in this area is needed.”

Sponsorship of sporting events

Sponsorship of major sporting events at global, regional and national levels is another key strategy used by transnational alcohol companies (which are gaining increasing dominance in the production and branding of alcohol beverages). Such sponsorship can significantly increase awareness of their brands to new audiences. In addition, alcohol producers engage in partnership with sports leagues and clubs to reach viewers and potential consumers in different parts of the world.

The increasing market of e-sports, including competitive gaming events, is another opportunity to sponsor events and increase brand recognition and international sales. So is product placement in movies and serials, many of which are streamed on international subscription channels. According to an analysis of the 100 highest-grossing box office U.S. movies between 1996 and 2015, branded alcohol was shown in almost half of them.

A focus on marketing to specific audiences

The lack of regulation to address cross-border marketing of alcohol is of particular concern for children and adolescents, women, and heavy drinkers.

Studies have shown that starting to drink alcohol at a young age is a predictor of hazardous drinking in young adulthood and beyond. Furthermore, teenage drinkers are more vulnerable to harm from alcohol consumption than older drinkers. Areas of the world with young and growing populations, such as Africa and Latin America, are being particularly targeted. 

In addition, alcohol consumption among women is an important growth sector for alcohol production and sales. While three quarters of the alcohol that the world drinks is consumed by males, alcohol marketers tend to see the lower rate of women drinking as an opportunity to grow their market, often depicting drinking by women as a symbol of empowerment and equality. They organize corporate social responsibility initiatives, on topics such as breast cancer and domestic violence, and engage with women known for their success in areas such as sports or the arts to promote brands of alcohol.

Heavy and dependent drinkers are another target for marketing efforts, since in many countries just 20% of current drinkers drink well over half of all alcohol consumed. Alcohol-dependent people frequently report a stronger urge to drink alcohol when confronted with alcohol-related cues, yet they rarely have an effective way to avoid exposure to the content of the advertising or promotion.

Existing regulation primarily limited to individual states

While many countries have some form of restrictions on alcohol marketing in place, generally they tend to be relatively weak. In a WHO 2018 study, it was found that, while most countries have some form of regulation for alcohol marketing in traditional media, almost half have no regulation in place for Internet (48%) and social media (47%) marketing of alcohol.

Meanwhile, sustained attention and work by national governments, the public health community and WHO to limit the availability and promotion of tobacco products, with specific attention to the cross-border aspects of tobacco production and marketing, has led to life-saving reductions in global tobacco use and exposure.

International cooperation required

The report concludes that national governments need to integrate comprehensive restrictions or bans of alcohol marketing, including its cross-border aspects, in public health strategies. It highlights key features and options for the regulation of cross-border marketing of alcohol and stresses the need for strong collaboration between states in this area.  

Note for editors:

Drinking alcohol is causally linked to an array of health problems such as mental and behavioural disorders, including alcohol dependence; major noncommunicable diseases such as liver cirrhosis, some cancers and cardiovascular diseases; and injuries and deaths resulting from violence and road traffic crashes.

Selected Adverse Events Reported after COVID-19 Vaccination

COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. Millions of people in the United States have received COVID-19 vaccines, and these vaccines will undergo the most intensive safety monitoring in U.S. history. CDC recommends you get a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as you are eligible. Adverse events described on this page have been reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS).
Categories: C.D.C. (U.S.), Health

COVID-19 Travel Recommendations by Country

Search COVID-19 risk assessment by country larger map
Categories: C.D.C. (U.S.), Health
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